How It's Made

At Baldwin, we believe that quality should never be a compromise. From using the finest materials to crafting our hardware by hand, we are committed to creating high-quality hardware that not only looks beautiful and flawless but also endures the rigors of time.

Step 1: Cut
Step 1 - Cut

Finest Materials

Before the hardware takes it shape, we begin with raw bars of solid brass. Brass is a highly dependable and durable metal that naturally resists corrosion. Holding a piece of solid brass Baldwin hardware in your hand, you will immediately notice the difference – it is heavier, stronger, and smoother than hardware that is made of aluminum or plated steel.

Step 2: Forged
Step 2 - Forged

Forged to Last

Skilled artisans transform raw brass to beautiful hardware through an age old and time-tested technique known as heat forging – pounding hot metal into a specially made die. In contrast to the simpler forging technique known as casting, heat forging requires more intensive work and careful attention to detail, but it produces stronger, heavier products.

Step 3: Trimmed
Step 3 - Trimmed

Smoothing Out Rough Edges

Before the hardware can be finished, it gets a trim. Skilled operators work the stamping press that trims the extra metal left by the forge. Then, another machine grinds the surface to remove oxidation created from the forge, revealing the smooth metal.

Step 4: Ground
Step 4 - Ground

The Finishing Touch

Baldwin hardware comes in a full spectrum of 21 lustrous finishes ranging from glossy to matte, smooth to textured. Depending on the desired look, whether clean and minimalistic or well-worn and vintage, the hardware will go through a very different process.

More About Finishes

Step 5: Polished
Step 5 - Polished

Polished To Shine

In the final step of production, our hardware goes through two stages of polishing – the first to thoroughly remove any imperfections such as scratches or nicks and the second to buff the hardware to a flawless shine. In the first stage, fast spinning wheels wipe away potential scratches left by the forge. Then jeweler’s rouge is used to carefully buff the metal.